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 The W201 Series

Almost a century after Mercedes-Benz introduced its very first car, the world-renowned prestigious automakers debuted its first C-Class
car, the 190. Not officially named the C-Class until 1993 when the
second group of cars was introduced, the Mercedes-Benz C-Class was
universally referred to as the “compact class”. The main differences
between the C-Class and its forbearers: the E, S, and SL-Class include
the cost of the vehicle and their enhanced safety features.


Designed by Mercedes-Benz engineer Bruno Sacco, the 190 sports car
engine features a multi-linked rear suspension, a body structure built
from high-strength steel, commendable aerodynamics, and superb safety
features. Mercedes-Benz also manufactured a 190D known as the “whisper
diesel.”

Production of the 190 ceased in 1993 and was officially replaced by the
new Mercedes-Benz C-Class. At this point Mercedes decided to stop
“over-engineering” the vehicles. However, since their racing cars were AMG-tuned and won many races, many 190 owners wanted their models AMG-tuned as well.

Features of the Mercedes-Benz 190

The Mercedes-Benz 190 has a 4-door saloon body style, offered in diesel
(turbo & non-turbo) as well as regular, and engine options: 2.0,
2.3, 2.5, 3.0, 6 or 8 liter. Most of the Mercedes-Benz 190 engines
offered Inline-4 (I4) cylinders, but the 6-liter version offered an
Inline-6 (I6). The four-speed Mercedes-Benz 190′s offered automatic or
manual transmission, while the five-speed transmission was strictly
manual.

The Mercedes-Benz 190, dubbed the “Baby Benz”, sported front and rear
anti-roll bars, anti-dive and anti-squat geometry, and the first
patented 5-link rear suspension. Among the advanced safety features of
the 190 were airbags, seatbelt tensioners, and an anti-lock braking system.

The 190 was manufactured in the Mercedes plants located in Bremen and Sindelfingin, Germany.

Did you enjoy the article? What memories do you have of the C-Class? What are you driving now? Discuss here!

 
 
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