Notices
M-Class (W164) 2006-2011: ML280CDI, ML320CDI, ML420CDI, ML350, ML500, ML550

2008 Ml320 CDI check engine light

 
Old 05-11-2016, 02:33 PM
  #26  
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Mercedes benz ml 320
Hi can u help whit my Mercedes benz ml320 2007
b2/6 (left hot film mass air flow sensor). value is above limit. What the problem is? Thaks
sel Sakalis is offline  
Old 05-31-2016, 09:43 PM
  #27  
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Mercedes R cdi 2007,Mercedes GL320 cdi 2007
Hi ,I have same problem 2644-001 Check component b2/6 (left hot film mass air flow sensor). value is above limit.You have solved the problem?or someone knows where is the error,I changed the mass air flow and not resolved,can not delete error.Thanks
Max1970 is offline  
Old 06-12-2017, 07:41 PM
  #28  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Kootenays BC Canada
Posts: 1
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
2008, ML 320 CDI
Awesome summary, Thanks!

Originally Posted by eeeehaw View Post
I have experienced two causes of oil leaks on this engine, and during the process of reading up on the topic across many forums have found other causes. Here's a summary that perhaps owners & DIYers will find useful:



(1) Most common cause is faulty/failed turbocharger air intake pipe seal. This is the black plastic pipe carrying air from the air cleaner box to the intake of the turbo. There is a smaller rubber hose-pipe plugged into the side of the turbo inlet end of this pipe that carrys crankcase blow-by vapors from the nearby Crank Case Ventilation (CCV) valve attached to the passenger side valve cover. When the engine oil is filled beyond rated capacity, which is approximately more than 2/3 of the way up the area between the 2 black plastic boundary indicators on the engine oil level measuring dipstick, the CCV will pass an excessive amount of oil vapor into the turbo inlet, and when that can cause 2 nasty problems: (1) on an older faulty design air intake pipe the orange seal will leak oil slowly out and onto the top of the engine, which can cause several problems including the one described in this thread; (2) the oil vapor condenses within the engine intake system and after entering the engine intake manifold will mix with exhaust soot coming from the Exhaust Gas Recirculator (EGR) valve creating a gummy substance that eventually impedes the proper flow of air into the cylinders, cakes up the insides of the manifold, and impedes the motion of the intake actuator vanes ("stir vanes") for each cylinder.

Solution to leaking air intake pipe seal: (1) Mercedes has an improved design replacement air intake pipe seal & pipe; the old one has an ORANGE colored rubber seal, you can check by easily removing the pipe and looking at the end that was attached to the turbo intake, and some have been reported to just push onto the turbo intake without a metal pipe clamp (not all, tho); the new replacement has a BLACK colored rubber seal, and a metal pipe clamp. Fortunately, this is a fast, easy, relatively inexpensive repair that many DIYers undertake or that should not cost a lot for a mechanic to do. (2) Some owners have added an after-market (non-MB) oil-air separator device between the CCV valve and the turbo air intake pipe to reduce or eliminate the crankcase oil vapor entering the engine, available from a wide variety of manufacturers including one in Germany to address this common problem with this engine; some (such as myself) built such a separator from inexpensive parts from a hardware store. I also chose to replace the CCV valve for good measure, and MB has an updated design for that part as well.


(2) Oil cooler gasket leak; this is the second most frequently reported cause. The engine oil cooler is bolted to the top of the engine block under the intake manifold, and it in turn is connected to both engine coolant and oil passages. It cools/warms engine oil to the temperature of the coolant as they both circulate through a heat exchanger. The heat exchange device ("cooler") itself rarely goes bad, but is apparently has happened via internal corrosion, typically by the introduction of the wrong type of coolant into the engine. The majority of problems are due to one or more seal gaskets eroding over time, allowing the oil, which is under high pump pressure, to leak out onto the top of the engine block and subsequently onto other engine electrical pipes and most notably the intake stir actuator motor and eventually causing failures of those other systems. I have read reports of severe failures of one or more of these gaskets resulting in 1-2 quarts of oil added to the engine every fuel tank refill, puddles of oil on the ground, oil over both the front and rear of the engine, oil all along the underside carriage, etc, and CEL/MEL OBDC codes of low oil pressure.


Solution: Replace the seal gaskets for the oil cooler heat exchanger. This is a relatively big job, with reports of typically minimum 8-12 hrs for a mechanic or DIYer to do, as it involved removing the turbo, intake manifold, and everything else immediately above them to gain access to the oil cooler. While the intake manifold is off, it should be thoroughly cleaned of any soot & oil buildup inside (I hear that diesel or carburetor cleaning fluid works well after a good soaking, compressed air blasting, etc). As noted above, some owners have opted to replace the relatively expensive oil cooler itself while the engine is apart for future peace of mind, especially if the engine has 150,000 miles on it, and the vane actuator ("stir") motor since it's also hard to get to when the engine is assembled and is prone to failures.


(3) Leaking turbocharger mounting bracket oil seals. The high-speed operation of the turbo shaft requires oil lubrication of its bearings to maintain long life, therefore the turbo is mounted on a vertical support bracket/shaft that contains passages for engine oil to be pumped up from the engine block to the turbo bearings. That support shaft has 2 gaskets, one that is between the support shaft and the top of the engine block and another between the top of the shaft and the turbo that is bolted onto it. Either of those gaskets erode, or the bolts securing the support shaft become loose from either the engine or the turbo, and oil can leak out onto the top rear of the engine, including the hot exhaust pipes attached to the turbo causing the burnt oil smell. Replacement of these gaskets is not terribly expensive, as the turbo and its support shaft are easily removed, and the gaskets are fairly inexpensive. I personally experienced this leak with my engine and was able to replace myself.


(4) Turbocharger bearing oil seal leak/failure. This is much less common, but has happened. This will leak oil onto the top of the engine IF you also have the older turbo air intake pipe with the orange seal (see #1 above). The high speed (10,000rpm or more is not uncommon I hear) turbo shaft is hard on its bearings and associated oil seals, and with high-pressure oil pumped from the engine bearing down on the seals you can imagine that something will eventually wear out. Fortunately, Garret and other modern turbochargers are designed to last a long time, but premature failures happen sometimes. When the turbo oil seal begins leaking slowly, there will be oil on the intake vanes that looks remarkably similar to what it looks like when the intake pipe seal or CCV valve fails (see #1 above) so it may be hard to definitively diagnose one from the other (since #1 is so much cheaper to do and much more common, it's worth proceeding with doing it first anyway, including replacing the CCV valve IMO). A failed turbo oil seal can cause that nasty gummy build-up inside the intake manifold, and oil accumulation in the resonator and intercooler at the front of the engine, so should be taken care of as soon as possible. New turbos are expensive, rebuilt ones are considered by many mechanics as being as good as new at 1/2-2/3 the price, but they're still expensive and will require a few hours work to replace. It's been advised to buy a turbo along with it's exhaust vane actuator motor (bolted together) as they are better calibrated by the supplier to work together, altho there is debate among engineers & mechanics about that since the engine control module (computer) is supposedly designed to "self calibrate".


BTW, failure of the intake vane actuator "stir" motor does not cause the vehicle to go into "limp mode" as it is an idle engine speed emission control ("stirs" the air entering the cylinders for better combustion for lower exhaust pollutants) that does not lead to catastrophic engine failure potential. As a simple comparison, the failure of the turbo exhaust vane actuator motor or its linkage will lead to limp mode, as it can cause dangerous over-boost intake air pressure for the cylinders; there are other causes of limp mode, but I have not heard anyone report the stir motor failure as one.
Thanks for the awesome summary, I had mine up and running in no time, leaking oil from the orange seal onto the wires caused the malfunction...

--Do you happen to know the new and improved part numbers for the:

Orange seal 642-094-00-80
CCV/ hockey puck/ Bleeder Valve 642-010-18-91?

I hope a new puck CCV design may help limit the flow of oil to the turbo entry. I will take a look at some oil separator designs too, sound like a great preventative fix.

Last edited by Speyside; 06-12-2017 at 08:05 PM.
Speyside is offline  
Old 06-13-2017, 02:53 AM
  #29  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 267
Received 15 Likes on 12 Posts
e320
great write up eeehaw

i have had 2 of these motors- both 2008 and both of them the black plastic intake part that hold the big orange seal to the turbo cracked- more on the bottom where you could not see it

it is not a cheap part but worth the upgrade

anyone with persistent leaks with the big orange seal should pull that piece out and inspect it carefully

still change my orange seal every other oil change- i change oil on 5000 miles
clvincent is offline  
Old 06-13-2017, 06:00 AM
  #30  
MBWorld Fanatic!
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Westchester, N.Y.
Posts: 4,108
Received 346 Likes on 333 Posts
2002 ML 320 & 2006 ML500
Originally Posted by Speyside View Post
Thanks for the awesome summary, I had mine up and running in no time, leaking oil from the orange seal onto the wires caused the malfunction...

--Do you happen to know the new and improved part numbers for the:

Orange seal 642-094-00-80
CCV/ hockey puck/ Bleeder Valve 642-010-18-91?

I hope a new puck CCV design may help limit the flow of oil to the turbo entry. I will take a look at some oil separator designs too, sound like a great preventative fix.
Please UPDATE YOUR PROFILE in USER CP to include the year and where you live.
Attached Thumbnails 2008 Ml320 CDI check engine light-aaaaaaaaab.jpg  
Maj. Dundee is offline  
Old 06-13-2017, 06:01 AM
  #31  
MBWorld Fanatic!
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Westchester, N.Y.
Posts: 4,108
Received 346 Likes on 333 Posts
2002 ML 320 & 2006 ML500
Post you entire vin#.
Maj. Dundee is offline  
Old 07-12-2018, 02:05 PM
  #32  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 1
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
bmw

Same fuse blown replaced fuse and pops straight away. Orange breather pipe was loose so guessing oil in loom any idea what’s popping it?



Originally Posted by jl553 View Post
I have 10 codes,e.g.M55,sensors,etc.The repair shop changed the fuse on my 2008 ML320 CDI and after couple of times the fuses being blown out,the fuse finally got settled.But the check engine light popped back on. Is it possible that I have to replace the motor or even the entire oil cooler then? Some tech mentioned the oil leak from one of the lines (I am curious to know how often the oil leak can occur on the lines rather than seals/gaskets?)
Scott Culbert is offline  
 

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:
You have already rated this thread Rating: Thread Rating: 0 votes,  average.

Quick Reply: 2008 Ml320 CDI check engine light


Contact Us - About Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: