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Old 07-22-2007, 07:02 PM   #1
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Difference between Diesel #1 & 2

What is the difference between Diesel #2 or 1? I think that it has something to do with different areas of the world where it has a higher tendency to freeze or somesort?

Can someone set me straight on this curiousity?
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Old 07-22-2007, 08:00 PM   #2
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#2 is pure diesel plus some additives.
#1 is diesel and kerosene mix with additives.
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Old 07-22-2007, 09:22 PM   #3
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#2 is pure diesel plus some additives.
#1 is diesel and kerosene mix with additives.
It is funny. In my 1999 W210 owner's manual it states that in the depth of winter it is OK to mix not more than 10% of kerosene in a tank of diesel but to expect power drop. Kerosene is widely used as a cheap cooking fuel in parts of Asia though its popularity declined due to its strong pungent smell.

So I presume that #1 diesel is winter fuel.
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Old 07-23-2007, 08:09 AM   #4
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#1 diesel aka kerosine has low parafine(wax) content.
Parafine is used to lubricate the injection pump and the injectors.
#1 was used in the winter time to limit gelling of the fuel.
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Old 07-25-2007, 12:18 AM   #5
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#1 diesel aka kerosine has low parafine(wax) content.
Parafine is used to lubricate the injection pump and the injectors.
#1 was used in the winter time to limit gelling of the fuel.
I was posting something on the E211 side with Alan Smithee about diesel fuel and heating oil.

Is heating oil (dyed red but similar to diesel) useable on CDI engines? I asked that because I suspect the rules on heating oil is not as stringent as automobile and truck diesel and has more sulfur.
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Old 07-25-2007, 03:12 AM   #6
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It should be the same stuff, only no road taxes.
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Old 07-25-2007, 04:39 AM   #7
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It should be the same stuff, only no road taxes.
Be careful though. This must be very market dependent but even if we used to have heating oil in a form that could be used on diesel engines, that has changed now. It is not only the sulphur content, old engines still accept high sulphur and actually our heating oil too has very low sulphur (perhaps not ULSD level, not sure) but the main issue is lubricants and perhaps some other additional stuff that now has been completely discontinued from heating oil. Our local heating oil should not be used even on very old diesel engines.
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Old 07-25-2007, 05:57 PM   #8
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Be careful though. This must be very market dependent but even if we used to have heating oil in a form that could be used on diesel engines, that has changed now. It is not only the sulphur content, old engines still accept high sulphur and actually our heating oil too has very low sulphur (perhaps not ULSD level, not sure) but the main issue is lubricants and perhaps some other additional stuff that now has been completely discontinued from heating oil. Our local heating oil should not be used even on very old diesel engines.
Only in cases of emergency.

I know of a friend living in rural farming areas with a Powerstroke diesel and a large heating oil tank. He suffered no ill effects though his truck is some 10 years old.
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Old 07-26-2007, 05:03 AM   #9
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Here in Europe we call the one with parrafine added 'winter diesel'. All gasstations switch to it around October/November, around the time we put Winter tires on so to say. The parrafine prevents the fuel to start gelling at sub zero temps, I believe below -10C or something...

btw adding kerosine or a little bit of high octane gas is a well known trick to get a 'dirty' diesel through emissions test...
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Old 07-26-2007, 08:20 AM   #10
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Here in Europe we call the one with parrafine added 'winter diesel'. All gasstations switch to it around October/November, around the time we put Winter tires on so to say. The parrafine prevents the fuel to start gelling at sub zero temps, I believe below -10C or something...

btw adding kerosine or a little bit of high octane gas is a well known trick to get a 'dirty' diesel through emissions test...
Parrafine is a wax, when it's mixed with diesel fuel it will gell at low temperatures. Winter fuel has lower quantity of parrafine that's why you shouldnt run winter fuel year round.

The place that I work for uses kerosine year round to limit smoke out the pipe, but in return we go thru many injectors and pumps.
By adding high octane gasoline to kerosine you just made jet fuel
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Old 07-26-2007, 09:39 AM   #11
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Parrafine is a wax, when it's mixed with diesel fuel it will gell at low temperatures. Winter fuel has lower quantity of parrafine that's why you shouldnt run winter fuel year round.

The place that I work for uses kerosine year round to limit smoke out the pipe, but in return we go thru many injectors and pumps.
By adding high octane gasoline to kerosine you just made jet fuel
I agree, must be a misunderstanding from Lancelot, paraffine is the problem at cold weather, the stuff that blocks filters. You have to try to reduce it from the winter fuel.
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Old 07-26-2007, 10:45 PM   #12
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Parrafine is a wax, when it's mixed with diesel fuel it will gell at low temperatures. Winter fuel has lower quantity of parrafine that's why you shouldnt run winter fuel year round.

The place that I work for uses kerosine year round to limit smoke out the pipe, but in return we go thru many injectors and pumps.
By adding high octane gasoline to kerosine you just made jet fuel
I must confess that I will not put heating oil in my diesel car unless I have run out of fuel and am stuck in the middle of nowhere. Those piezzo injectors must be very expensive to buy and replace.

For winter I plug in the block heater and the engine gets very warm. I have only tried it once. Toronto is not as cold as Alberta.
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Old 07-26-2007, 10:45 PM
 
 
 
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1, 12, 2, class, dieasel, diesel, diesel1, difference, differences, fuel, heating, jet, mix, number, oil



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