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OM642 Timing Chain Replacement DIY - GL 350 Blutech

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OM642 Timing Chain Replacement DIY - GL 350 Blutech

 
Old 11-22-2017, 12:31 PM
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Originally Posted by diesel315 View Post
.........zip V valve train in one long chain instead of 2 or more, chain/guides must be in incredible stress, specially the "reverse" side of the V, I thought that was why other engines I have seen use 2 chains.


I agree with most of what you say but I don't think adding multiple chains would have made much difference if they were still undersized or under-lubricated.

Prime example is a Ford 4.0 V6 SOHC gasoline engine in year 2000 Explorer & Ranger, which used three timing chains! It was a disaster if owners followed manufacturers oil change interval like so many did (I have not and it's still fine after 230,000 miles!).

Last edited by arto_wa; 05-28-2018 at 09:45 AM.
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Old 11-23-2017, 05:33 PM
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Incidentally, I bought a kit which included the timing chain, tensioner, and the guide rails. I decided against changing the guides because I couldn't find any wear on the ones that were visible, and the additional time required to change the ones that I couldn't see was just too great. Changing the chain instantly corrected the clattering noise on startup, so my assumption is that the stretched chain was the issue. It could be that worn guides contributed, but there is of course no way to know withouth replacing them and inspecting them.
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Old 05-28-2018, 04:23 AM
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Someone wanted speculation for timing chain wearing out early. If I knew for sure the country it was made in, (since it is a global market for auto parts manufacture now, and ALL auto makers farm out the work now instead of in house) I could then take a wild guess on the quality of materials and workmanship. There is a reason and either it is that the now modern younger engineers can't handle it, or the parts are manufactured in country's that have factory workers that don't give a rip about quality. Story after story in this forum and others, tells us that in the old days the engines and other automotive parts or units where way more reliable and durable, parts didn't wear out or break like they do now. So something has changed that is very obvious.
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Old 05-28-2018, 09:43 AM
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It actually is just the opposite - today's cars last lot longer than the ones made in the 60's for example, however they are way more complicated so comparison is not fair.

I think many people just complain naturally. It's the easiest thing to do.

Cheers!
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:04 AM
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I bought an OEM timing chain kit to replace the worn one. It was made in Germany by Febi/Bilstein. If you look around the engine bay you see parts from many countries in Europe, but they are primarily sourced from Germany. I'm convinced that the extended oil change intervals contribute to the failures, and I've switched to 6,000 mile drain intervals. I've only driven the vehicle 6,000 miles since I did the work, so I won't know for a long time if this is the correct strategy and there are too many variables to make a conclusion valid anyway.

Originally Posted by exhaustgases View Post
Someone wanted speculation for timing chain wearing out early. If I knew for sure the country it was made in, (since it is a global market for auto parts manufacture now, and ALL auto makers farm out the work now instead of in house) I could then take a wild guess on the quality of materials and workmanship. There is a reason and either it is that the now modern younger engineers can't handle it, or the parts are manufactured in country's that have factory workers that don't give a rip about quality. Story after story in this forum and others, tells us that in the old days the engines and other automotive parts or units where way more reliable and durable, parts didn't wear out or break like they do now. So something has changed that is very obvious.
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Old 05-29-2018, 10:31 AM
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I took my 642 engine apart after it bend the rod on water puddle and at 180k miles I don't see any excessive wear on the chain. Usually the wear shows first on small sprocket and even my sprocket might not look perfect, it looks decent.
From times I drove motorcycle I remember chain test by holding it sideways and observe sag. This one sags a bit, but I have nothing to compare it to, so can't say how much longer it would last.
Still long way from Fiat I drove decades ago and at 80k km (50k miles) the chain show outside after cutting the cover.
BTW there is long way from OEM part and original part.

Last edited by kajtek1; 05-29-2018 at 10:35 AM.
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Old 05-29-2018, 11:48 AM
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E320 CDI, Jetta 06 TDI, Boat:2 Cummins+1 Yanmar

arto san: posted Jetta 2006 TDI oil test so you could compare with yours, Blackstone did comment on the lead, but not related to timing chain of course since it is rubber!
The only thing that caught our eye in this Jetta is the lead level - that shows above average bearing wear. Other metals were at decent levels (copper could be a little lower, but we're not complaining),
so we aren't ready to call this a problem just yet. Lead can also be driven up by a particle streak, which occurs when a piece of debris gets lodged in a bearing, displacing some lead. After it works free, lead drops with little to no apparent damage. No significant contamination was found, so let's just see how things look in another 7,000 miles.
I wonder if an extra-long tensioner would at least delay the Timing chain issue in the OM642, no idea if there is space.

Last edited by diesel315; 05-29-2018 at 11:57 AM. Reason: a
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Old 05-29-2018, 06:34 PM
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I had read (if I recall correctly) that the low levels of zinc in todays' diesel-spec'd engine oil is to blame for increased wear. The newer oil needs to be low in zinc to protect the DPF, if I recall.

Last edited by peter2772000; 05-29-2018 at 06:42 PM.
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Old 06-28-2018, 06:59 AM
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Gl 350 bluetec
Torque spec waaaaay off

The correct torque spec for the bolts on the valve cover is 8Nm max. That's 6 lb/ft. I can imagine 80lb will ruin the bolt or the head
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Old 06-28-2018, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Limomaster5 View Post
The correct torque spec for the bolts on the valve cover is 8Nm max. That's 6 lb/ft. I can imagine 80lb will ruin the bolt or the head
The spec is 80 INCH pounds as I correctly stated above.
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Old 08-23-2018, 03:12 PM
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Any chance you can provide link for tools you used? Thanks
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Old 08-24-2018, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by jpd686 View Post
Any chance you can provide link for tools you used? Thanks
I prefer not to post links because they expire eventually.

For the injector puller, do a Google search on "VW Audi Diesel Injector Puller" and you will find several versions. The key is that you need the 14 x 1.5 adapter.

For the Timing Chain Rivet tool do a Google search on "Mercedes Timing Chain Rivet Tool" and again, you'll find several versions. You need one that rivets a double row chain. I bought mine off eBay.
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Old 08-25-2018, 08:20 PM
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Awesome thank you I’ll start searching.
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Old 08-26-2018, 07:38 PM
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I found this one but it doesn’t say anything about what adapters will work. Has anyone used this kit or know if it will work? Found other ones but this one is half the price haha.
https://www.greatnecksaw.com/27282-vw-audi-diesel-injector-puller-kit-oem.html

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Old 08-27-2018, 03:19 PM
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https://m.ebay.ca/itm/Timing-Chain-Change-Vehicle-Motor-Niet-Tools-rivets-riveted-Mercedes-W203-W212/231797348854?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.M BE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D20180306143916%26meid%3De84a7c fe28d84ae89413d640dcb592fd%26pid%3D100935%26rk%3D1 %26rkt%3D12%26sd%3D283036647219%26itm%3D2317973488 54&_trksid=p2056116.c100935.m2460

found this for the Chain separator and riveter. Does this look right? Hate to buy these tools and have them be wrong haha

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Old 10-28-2018, 09:36 PM
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Just finishing up doing my timing chain. The above tool worked great.

Couple things I want to touch base on. Great write up, just a couple things to add. The indent marks on the timing sprockets are very hard to see and find. I have circled them on the below photo. Hard to see but they are there. I didn’t even see them and took mine apart in the wrong spot and had to make sure I got them back properly. Second picture is of the timing mark point for the crank shaft. Hard to find but you look straight down from the top of engine and you can seee it.


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Old 10-29-2018, 12:14 PM
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Glad things went well for you. If you look at my photos I had taken a yellow grease pencil and filled the holes with that so they were easier to see. It makes a big difference in visibility.
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Old 10-29-2018, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by sak335 View Post
Glad things went well for you. If you look at my photos I had taken a yellow grease pencil and filled the holes with that so they were easier to see. It makes a big difference in visibility.
thanks yes I noticed them once it was too late haha. It is just very hard to see in your pictures so I thought I would add a slightly better picture and circle them so others know where to look if they are blind like myself! I initially thought you meant the holes in the sprocket itself not the indents on the sprocket haha.
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Old 04-11-2019, 03:25 PM
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anyone knows a good shop or private mechanic in northern VA, DC or MD area that can replace the timing chain ? I can hear the ping when driving, also can hear the rattle when I start it in the morning.
2014 gl350 50k miles.
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Old 04-11-2019, 04:58 PM
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These guys did all my work before I moved from Northern VA:

http://benzeliteautomotive.com/
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Old 04-11-2019, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by manne View Post
anyone knows a good shop or private mechanic in northern VA, DC or MD area that can replace the timing chain ? I can hear the ping when driving, also can hear the rattle when I start it in the morning.
2014 gl350 50k miles.
Any sprinter/freightliner shop can do it.

Buy have you called our local dealerships? They're pretty competitive sometimes.

Euromotorcars has a dedicated sprinter shop up in gaithersburg.
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Old 04-20-2019, 06:38 PM
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This is an excellent post and has been very helpful. I am currently replacing the chain on my car. I have the valve cover off and ready to put at TDC, but I can't see or find the location to see if the crank is at TDC. In one of the replies above it states you can see it by looking straight down from the top of the engine, but I have all sorts of pipes and things in the way. Does anyone know where it can be found or do I have to remove items off the front of the engine?

Also, I thought I would share what I used to pull the injectors and camshaft cover. I used a Harbor Freight slide hammer I had, item 60554. It has a hook that is perfect for sliding under the bolts on the cover. For the injectors, I welded a M14x1.5 nut onto a rod coupler that then screwed onto the slide hammer (M10x1.5 I recall). Not sure if HF still sells these new.

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