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Fueling Bluetec

 
Old 12-10-2013, 08:17 AM
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Fueling Bluetec

I know that leaving a gas vehicle running while fueling generally sets an engine light. Is this the same for the new diesels or can you let it run while fueling?
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Old 12-10-2013, 09:44 AM
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I never have tried it but isn't the light you are talking about because the vehicle is running with the fuel cap off? Something to do with emissions and vapors not supposed to be getting out via a faulty fuel cap seal.
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Old 12-10-2013, 09:59 AM
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Why would you be fueling with the motor running? With a gasser it's a explosion danger. Not so much for a Diesel, by why do it?
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Old 12-10-2013, 10:12 AM
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I generally leave my BlueTec running at many times when I would normally turn off a gas engine. However, out of habit, I do turn it off while refueling.
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Old 12-10-2013, 11:53 AM
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The thought occurred now while the weather here in Mn is below zero and if my wife was fueling and wanted to keep heat going in the car, #1, did not want a problem with the car and #2 did not want to bring it up for discussion with her if there was not going to be a problem. Car is not even here yet, so also the question was asked partly out of boredom. I think it is being born today so at least it is getting closer. From a safety standpoint I'm sure I will always shut it off when fueling.

Thanks
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Old 12-10-2013, 08:04 PM
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New wave diesels - old school no shutdown - new school treat exactly like a gasser
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Old 12-10-2013, 09:18 PM
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Two other factors to consider, at many stations today, the diesel and gasoline pumps are together, no longer on separate islands. What if the person next to you has a fuel spill? The gasoline vapors are what's flammable. Also, some stations have signs requiring that the engine be turned off while refueling, sometimes an individual station thing, sometimes a city/town ordainance.
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Old 12-11-2013, 08:06 AM
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I am old school. I believe that it does not make a difference if you want to keep the vehicle running while filling. Myself, I will shut the motor off unless it is so cold outside that I need the heater on to keep the car warm. Same thing goes for summertime weather.

I grew up working in service stations in the 70's. The 70's vehicles built in that day I am sure they were more unsafe than today's vehicles. I have never heard of any type of fire at a service station island in the area. If I did I am sure my boss would have said "do not out gas in any vehicle while it is running."

I am also sure that if you go to any truck stop in the wintertime, you will hear all those big trucks running while fueling.
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Old 12-11-2013, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by skw View Post
Two other factors to consider, at many stations today, the diesel and gasoline pumps are together, no longer on separate islands. What if the person next to you has a fuel spill? The gasoline vapors are what's flammable. Also, some stations have signs requiring that the engine be turned off while refueling, sometimes an individual station thing, sometimes a city/town ordinance.


It's not about what usually happens, it's about what COULD happen and the seriousness of the outcome if it does! Much the same reason you don't refill fuel cans in the bed of a truck or trunk of a car. Static electricity in those cases as you know can cause an explosion.
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Old 12-11-2013, 09:58 AM
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While I do not really see the point of leaving any vehicle running while filling up, I also do not see some massive safety issue that if ignored is going to high probability of an accident happening. Cars are running around pumps all the time be them driving in, driving out, waiting on a passenger to get out of the store or the very rare case of someone leaving it running while filling up. Heck there are signs around most stations that say do not use any electronic devises while filling up but I am betting it is a rare day someone turns off their cell phone. Most cars have all sorts of electronics running even when the key is pulled out, sometimes waking up when you open the door. At some point it becomes over worrying.

If the intent is to try and keep the car warm then I question how much it really helps for the few brief minutes it takes to fill up. Although my last car had a "Rest" feature, when you turned the car off and pressed that the heater would continue to run until it ran out of hot coolant. In cold climates it was great for short trips into stores and things of that nature. I am sure I was guilty of using that sometimes when filling up.
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Old 12-11-2013, 04:06 PM
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Thanks for all the replays. My main reason for asking was to find out if any codes would be set. Fab seems to indicate it should be shut off vs old ones that did not matter. No one indicates codes will be triggered if not shut off. I'm afraid if this keeps going it will turn into a drain or vacuum oil thread! Again thanks, just wanting info on these new hi tech diesels before the new one arrives. No doubt will have many more questions soon. Following the GLK thread with interest and seeing some sensors and software issues that our ML Bluetecs do not seem to have
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Old 12-12-2013, 01:06 PM
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Did my first diesel fill up today.

Two issues -- gas pump cut off at $75, which is annoying. Had to go through the motions a 2nd time to get a full tank.

When the tank was full some foam came out. I couldn't really get the nozzle fully in as the spring prevented it from getting in. As a result the rubber shield thing that is supposed to cover the tank did nothing. Am I don't something wrong?
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Old 12-12-2013, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by DR2000 View Post
Did my first diesel fill up today.

Two issues -- gas pump cut off at $75, which is annoying. Had to go through the motions a 2nd time to get a full tank.

When the tank was full some foam came out. I couldn't really get the nozzle fully in as the spring prevented it from getting in. As a result the rubber shield thing that is supposed to cover the tank did nothing. Am I don't something wrong?
The rubber shield thing on the pump nozzle? I never have seen one of those on a diesel pump but always on the gasoline ones. If that is what you mean then I half wonder if some bonehead put a gasoline nozzle on the end of the diesel hose but I'd thought these cars have fill necks that would prevent those from working in order to prevent someone from accidentally pumping in gasoline into a diesel car.

There are more than one type of diesel fuel nozzles used at pumps. Most of the runs I run into do not go fully into the vehicle(basically stop around the spring like you mentioned) but all of them so long as they are pumping at the proper speed have cut themselves off before a spill can happen. Sometimes I run into slower pumps though, those can tend to create a small spill.

Diesel does foam up as being pumped in. Actually if a patient enough person who is willing to pump very slowly towards the end of a fillup they probably can get another gallon or so of fuel into the vehicle. I know on my old work truck after the pump would shut itself off from being "full" I could then slowly pump another 3-5 gallons into the thing.

As far as the price cut off thing, those annoy me to all ends. I find in my area Shell stations specifically have it and due to that I just never go to Shell stations. I was recently traveling and filled up at a Valero and they had a sticker right on the pump that said the dollar cut offs per brand credit card.
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Old 12-12-2013, 02:16 PM
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I have found that Chevron stations have better, more modern nozzles at their stations that are clean. If you live on the East coast, they may still be branded as a Texaco station. If the nozzle has the flap, I have noticed the old residual diesel is sometimes on that flap and will drip on the vehicle. Better without the flap.
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Old 12-12-2013, 02:22 PM
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At some point in time I quickly learned to kind of turn the nozzle into a vehicle to help prevent a possible spill due to that flap. I have even had faulty gas nozzles that leaked as soon as you involved gravity.

I pretty much exclusively use Chevron stations but down here cleanliness of the diesel pumps seems hit or miss. Typically if it is a pump that sees a lot of usage then chances are it is not a "clean" area but that is because of the fuel characteristics. I know people who go so far as to have special gloves/mitts they use for handling the nozzles.
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Old 12-12-2013, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Coreysimms View Post
I have found that Chevron stations have better, more modern nozzles at their stations that are clean. If you live on the East coast, they may still be branded as a Texaco station. If the nozzle has the flap, I have noticed the old residual diesel is sometimes on that flap and will drip on the vehicle. Better without the flap.
Actually the gas station that I used it on an interstate and was just fully rebuilt.



Originally Posted by Snipe656 View Post
At some point in time I quickly learned to kind of turn the nozzle into a vehicle to help prevent a possible spill due to that flap. I have even had faulty gas nozzles that leaked as soon as you involved gravity.
Can you explain this? How do you turn it in? (This may be a silly question.)
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Old 12-12-2013, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by DR2000 View Post
Can you explain this? How do you turn it in? (This may be a silly question.)
I will try and pay attention to how I do it next time and see if I can better verbalize it. I honestly can't seem to think of how to explain it in a way that even makes sense to me. I guess next time you are at a gas pump try and think of how could you get the nozzle from the pump and into the fill neck with the least amount of downward pointing of the nozzle.

Another thing I do out of habit when done fueling and pulling it out, I tap the nozzle a couple times on the fill neck. Just to try and avoid some drops of fuel getting on me. The smell of diesel fuel is rather lingering but I am sure anyone who sees me do this things I am trying to get every last drop of fuel I paid for.
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Old 12-14-2013, 12:07 PM
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I work with diesel vehicles and sometimes we keep the engine running. No issues....

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Old 12-15-2013, 05:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Snipe656 View Post
I know people who go so far as to have special gloves/mitts they use for handling the nozzles.
I do this in my Nissan Patrol work vehicle. I have a leather riggers glove I wear for refuelling, I do this for two reasons. 1) I hate the greasy feel and it is dangerous if you get it on your steering wheel, 2) I tend to eat on the run when at work and hate smelling or tasting it in my food (much the same as some heavy scented, especially citrus, industrial hand cleaners)!

When we get our new diesel ML in the new year, there will be a pair of gloves under the drivers seat for this very reason.
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Old 12-15-2013, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by hos View Post
I do this in my Nissan Patrol work vehicle. I have a leather riggers glove I wear for refuelling, I do this for two reasons. 1) I hate the greasy feel and it is dangerous if you get it on your steering wheel, 2) I tend to eat on the run when at work and hate smelling or tasting it in my food (much the same as some heavy scented, especially citrus, industrial hand cleaners)!

When we get our new diesel ML in the new year, there will be a pair of gloves under the drivers seat for this very reason.
Do the gloves end up smelling? Or do you keep them in a container?
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Old 12-15-2013, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by hos View Post
I do this in my Nissan Patrol work vehicle. I have a leather riggers glove I wear for refuelling, I do this for two reasons. 1) I hate the greasy feel and it is dangerous if you get it on your steering wheel, 2) I tend to eat on the run when at work and hate smelling or tasting it in my food (much the same as some heavy scented, especially citrus, industrial hand cleaners)!

When we get our new diesel ML in the new year, there will be a pair of gloves under the drivers seat for this very reason.


Same here. I work for a utility company and our trucks are International diesels. When I worked out in the field (took an office job last spring), I would always wear leather work gloves to refuel. Never had a dedicated pair, just used the 1st ones within reach. We would eat in the cab of the trucks on a daily basis, got to the point where that orange hand cleaner smelled good on your hands while eating compared to everything else. Not sure if the gloves smelled or not as the most diesel smell, when it was there, was coming from my boots from standing in spilled diesel form someone before me at the pump. Which I never understood as almost all pumps had buckets of speedy dry, and if not, we had some on the truck. If there's a spill, how easy is it to spread a lil bit?


Brings up another point that I noticed since I bought my BlueTec. I have never filled up my ML at any of the stations I used to go to w/ the work trucks. I have gloves in the ML but have only used them a few times to keep my hands warm. The stations I went to while working were generally more truck friendly, space to turn/maneuver, located on main ways or highway exits and priced higher. Those are the ones w/ the greasy handles and spilled fuel. The stations I go to w/ the ML are smaller and diesel is usually on the same island/pump w/ gasoline. I usually go bare handed as the diesel handle isn't used nearly as much and is just like putting gas in a regular car so no need for the gloves.
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Old 12-15-2013, 05:46 PM
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The diesel pumps are usually located on the station's outer aisle along with other gas hoses, for easier access by pickup and larger trucks, I suppose. But can anybody tell me why the diesel pump is inevitably blocked by a gasser when it's the only vehicle in the station and all the other aisles are open?
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Old 12-15-2013, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Shrdlu View Post
The diesel pumps are usually located on the station's outer aisle along with other gas hoses, for easier access by pickup and larger trucks, I suppose. But can anybody tell me why the diesel pump is inevitably blocked by a gasser when it's the only vehicle in the station and all the other aisles are open?
They do that to **** you off it becomes even more annoying if you are in an F250, happened to me this morning
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